• Luigi

Six Good Deeds That Bring Us Happiness



Buddhism teaches the mechanism of our fate as follows: Good cause, good effect; bad cause, bad effect; own cause, own effect. This means that both good results and bad results are the outcome of our own actions. The law of cause and effect is the universal truth. What it teaches us is, "Stop bad deeds; do good deeds." All misfortune and disaster we experience is the result of our own bad actions (bad cause, bad effect). So if you do not want to experience bad outcomes, avoid doing bad deeds. Likewise, all happiness and good fortune is the result of our own good actions (good cause, good effect). If you want to be happy, make an effort to do good deeds.

Since everyone detests suffering and wants to be happy, Buddhism urges us to avoid bad deeds and do good deeds. If you want to be happy, what you need to do is change your daily actions (seeds) to be more positive. So what kind of seeds should we plant? Let us learn from Shakyamuni Buddha. In more than 7000 volumes of sutras, Shakyamuni Buddha taught myriad good deeds. But if there are too many good deeds set out in front of us, we won't know which one to pick. We will be at a loss.

Let's take the example of clothes shopping. If there are hundreds and hundreds of clothes in the store, it will be very hard to pick just one item. You might get so overwhelmed that you end up not buying anything and going home with nothing. But if a store worker did the smart thing and picked out 5 or 6 items for you, then it would be easier for you to make a decision. In the same way, Shakyamuni Buddha condensed all the myriad good deeds into six so that we can easily put them into practice. These are called the Six Paramitas, or Six Good Deeds. They are giving, discipline, forbearance, diligence, contemplation and wisdom. If you do one of the six good deeds, you will end up doing all the other five as well. The six good deeds are as follows:


These six good deeds sum up the countless good deeds. Also, if you put one into practice, you will end up doing all the other five good deeds as well.

Summary

Buddhism teaches that it is your actions that generate your destiny, whether good or bad. We don't want to suffer misfortune; we seek to attain happiness. So Buddhism encourages us to stop bad deeds and do good deeds. Shakyamuni Buddha condensed the countless good deeds into six to make it easy for us to put them into practice. These six are called the Six Paramitas, or Six Good Deeds. "If you want to be happy, put these six good deeds into practice," taught Shakyamuni Buddha. These good deeds, which sum up the myriad good deeds, are called the Six Paramitas, or Six Good Deeds.